Autism Positive Parenting

10 things that I have learned about Autism

I have decided to share 10 things that I, as a parent, have learned about Autism. Everything in this list is formed from my own opinion. I understand if you do not agree!

As some of you may know (or may not know), my son has a form of autism.
He was originally diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome when he was 5.

Written by Echo

I think that for most parents, the diagnosis is the hard part.
For me, the diagnosis was relief.
I finally had a name and reasoning behind what we were dealing with.

I have decided to share 10 things that I, as a parent, have learned about Autism. Everything in this list is formed from my own opinion. I understand if you do not agree!

I have decided to share 10 things that I, as a parent, have learned about Autism.
Everything in this list is formed from my own opinion. I understand if you do not agree!


10 things:

1. There is NO cookie cutter form for Autism. Just like every “normal” person is different, so is every Autistic person.

2. Autism affects every single moment of your life. It alters your day to day living.

3. Autistic kids, even non-verbal ones, are often more aware than they seem. It may seem like they are not paying attention when, in reality, they are hanging on your every word.

4. Everyone stares.
Why does everyone stare?
Are they curious?
Are they being judgmental?

I have just started staring right back.

5. I do not use the word Autistic in my house. My son has learned from various sources that he can use his Autism as an excuse for poor behavior. We do not accept this. At home, he is treated like a “normal” kid. Autism is not an excuse.

6. My son has Autism but Autism can't have my son.
This goes with #5. I do not let my son fall into behaviors or patterns of actions simply because he has Autism. We have high expectations of him and we are going to do whatever it takes to help him get there.

7. Fixation/Obsession sucks. A lot of kids with Autism fixate on things and obsess on every aspect of these things. I know way more than I need to know about Super Mario, The Titanic and Submarines lost at sea.

8. Just because my son is “High Functioning” and verbal, doesn't mean that I do not deal with the issues that are prominent with Autism. I do. I deal with a lot of them.

9. I feel like too many parents of Autistic children are afraid to “parent”. Afraid to have expectations of their Autistic children. Afraid to punish or reprimand their Autistic children. I think Autism scares the parenting out of some people.

10. There is NOT enough Autism awareness. Too many people only have a vague notion of what Autism is and it is usually completely off. The spectrum is large and there is so much that we do not understand.

Autism has become a part of my life. It is there, everyday, in one form or another.
I wouldn't change it.
I love my boy with all of my heart.
I love everything that he is and I love what he has taught me.

If you have anything to share, please do!
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23 Comments

  1. Thank you so much! It always helps to get awareness out there and I feel like different perspectives are part of the awareness!

  2. Love this post Echo!! I completely agree with you, there really isn't enough awareness out there and a lot of people I talk to have absolutely no idea what Autism is or how to handle it. After Nicholas was diagnosed, our own school system said they would need to bring someone in to assist them in "dealing" with him. (Which is exactly why we decided to homeschool) Thanks for sharing!

  3. Thanks Amber! That is exactly why we homeschool too! I am so happy to get the word out! It is also, always nice, to know that we are not alone!

  4. Great post! I was a paraprofessional for a couple of years and worked with Autistic children… you are right on all accounts! We need more awareness and understanding! People that stare suck! I love that you're staring back!

  5. Bonnie a.k.a. LadyBlogger says:

    Thank you so much for writing this! I am a former elementary/middle school teacher and, unfortunately, what I learned about kids with special needs was from on-the-job-training. I have pinned this to my "education" Pinterest board.

  6. Thank you, Savanna! It is awesome that there are people that support and help spread awareness!

  7. Good luck to you and your family. I know with your attitude you will do well.
    Parenting, I found out is not easy but, it is very rewarding. I'm grandpa now.

  8. Thank you, Timothy! All we can do is try to do our best!

  9. Great post! I have two cousins who are autistic, one who is higher on the spectrum than the other. My Aunt is a strong and great Momma who has dedicated her life to raise awareness. They live in Delaware and I was able to walk with them last year in the Autism Walk. Thanks for sharing your story and also raining awareness!

  10. It's great to keep reading about autism, it really helps gain a better perspective/knowledge on it.

    Thank you for linking to Super Sunday Sync.

  11. Trish Roberts says:

    This is such a great piece in your blog! I felt the same way when my son was Diagnosed at 4 yrs old. He's 5 now. To me, it was answers that were finally found, I did cry though. But now with his diagnosis he is receiving more help. When I see anyone staring, I just tell myself it's because my son's a happy loving goofy child. I also try my best to treat him and his discipline actions as I would any other child. In my opinion, Autism isn't a illness, it's just a bit of a different way of living, and coping and learning. 🙂

  12. I totally "get it". Oh and I stare right back and on occasion give the ole stink eye! 😉

  13. I'm always interested and honoured when people share their personal experiences. Thank you.

    You mention that "there isn't enough awareness". What would you like to see change? How can I help people be more aware?

    Thanks for linking up to my weekly Bloglovin linky (http://www.journeysofthezoo.com/2013/11/bloglovin-hop-november14.html). I hope you make some new friends. I'm a new follower of yours (http://www.bloglovin.com/journeysofthezoo).

    Besos, Sarah
    Blogger at Journeys of The Zoo

  14. There are a lot of ways to spread awareness and become aware. Read some books, stories or blogs. Meet Autistic kids and get to know them, see how different they are!

    Thanks for stopping by!

  15. I think a lot of people stare because they are curious. They are trying to figure out what is going on. Those people are the ones who want to learn. It may be rude, but that is what people do. And I agree with you many parents with children with Autism are afraid to parent. Maybe for some of them it is overwhelming who knows. Hope you have a great day.

    Heidi’s Wanderings

  16. That is a very good point, Heidi!
    Although, sometimes, I wish they would just ask rather than stare.
    It is just the nature of the beast though!

  17. It is a long road and I took all the wrong turns at first. I listened to all of the books and doctors and forgot that it is really about MY son and MY family. You have to find what works for you! I am so happy that you found my post!

  18. Cynthia Slate says:

    Thank you for this post! It helps me to realize that I am not alone in my endeavors. Your post is my exact life. My son was diagnosed 2 months ago and it has truly been a blessing. I will say this, I am so used to the stares now that I don't even know they exist. I honestly don't care what others think about my parenting. They don't know even the half of what goes on in my house. There are not many people who would understand what we go through on a day to day basis, nor would be able to handle what we handle. I am a nurse and I have had to learn everything about autism through my son's pediatrician, because I had so little training. I have found that I am learning more from parents with autistic children. Everyone has truly been a blessing. Thank you so much for your post!

  19. I am sharing a link to this and the personal story you posted a few day ago on my blog tomorrow. My post is National Autism Awareness Month.

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