New to Homeschooling? Top Tips to Help Your Kids Focus on Learning

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Choosing to homeschool your child is a huge decision. There are a variety of reasons for you to be doing so—religion, lack of quality education in your area, a school’s inability to address your child’s special learning needs, and many more. Taking on the education of your children, however, is a huge responsibility. One of the bigger ones, though, is being able to keep your child on task. This is especially true if your child has gone to school before and has been used to seeing home as the place of play and rest. Because of this, they may tend to get distracted very easily during the first few months of homeschooling. If you find this to be true in your case, here are some things to consider.

Taking on the education of your children, however, is a huge responsibility. One of the bigger ones, though, is being able to keep your child on task. This is especially true if your child has gone to school before and has been used to seeing home as the place of play and rest.

Take Things Slow

It’s a good idea to take things slow the first week of staring homeschool. If your child was previously enrolled in public school or has a developmental delay, many things will be different and take your child some time to adjust. Sometimes pushing your child is not in their best interest or yours. Create a learning schedule that works best for you and your child. Every child is different, so try a variety of things to see what works best.

Create Learning Experiences

Creating positive learning experiences is an essential part of homeschooling your child. Although textbooks are great tools for learning, your child needs activities and learning adventures outside of the home. Instead of relying on educational television shows and the internet, engage your child in real-life experiences. Instead of gathering facts about polar bears, take your child to the zoo to see one in person to gather factual information.

Create a Routine

Both you and your child will benefit from having a routine. Children often respond well to routines because they know what to expect during certain times of the day. Although there should be some form of structure, you don’t have to have an activity, lesson or something else to do for every second of the day. When your child knows what to expect, they can transition from one activity or lesson to the next without any major disruptions.

Limit the Number of Distractions

A classroom at home and a classroom in a school building are two very different things. Your child may need a little guidance to stay on task without being distracted throughout the day. You may find it beneficial to dedicate a room or part of your home for homeschooling your child to limit the number of distractions they have. Interior window shutters may be another solution to keeping your child focused during activities and lessons. This will help them to not be distracted if their friends are outside playing after school while they’re doing their homeschool work—of course, this would depend on the academic routine that you set for your child as you may want to let them sleep in later and do their school work later as well.

Homeschooling may be a chore at times, but it is rewarding for you and your child. You have the power to teach your child in a way that benefits them the most and provide as much undivided attention as needed.

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